Answer Post

I got more questions than I thought I would, so here we go!

Question #1:
From JessieKaitlin: Why did you decide you want to be a doula?

Answer:
After my daughter was born and everything that happened, I was pretty depressed for about a year. My friend had an emergency cesarean about a month after my daughter’s first birthday, and that kind of opened my eyes about certain things.

A couple months later, we had to go to the dermatologist for a sore my husband had on his finger. While we were there, Blake told me I should become a midwife so he can write novels and not work.

I didn’t think much of it for a few weeks until I told a couple of my friends, and they were so excited about it, they researched schools and books, and one of them said I should become a doula until I can go to midwifery school (this was before I decided to do an apprenticeship instead of a school). I looked at a few, and the ones I looked at didn’t feel right, so she suggested Birthing From Withing. I booked their conference that was this April (I couldn’t go due to other things), so I am still technically in training.

When I picked up my first books, I knew this is what I was meant to do. It all comes so naturally and I absolutely love learning about it. In college, I quit after my sophomore year because I got bored. I couldn’t decide what I wanted for a major or a minor, and it feels like I was meant to help women through pregnancy and birth my entire life.

Question #2:
From marfmom: What is the process for becoming a doula? How do you manage being a doula if you have kids of your own (I imagine it must be difficult having to keep odd hours, depending on when are laboring)?

Answer:
The process depends on what kind of a doula you want to become. There are three kinds. Antepartum, which deals with women only while they are pregnant up until they are in labor (mostly women on bedrest and/or women with complicated pregnancies. They lend books and information to help the woman understand what is going on. Also, bedrest can become quite boring, so they also keep them company and help with other children during the time. Labor, which deals with the woman strictly in labor and a few hours postpartum. They do meet them a few times before labor and come a few times in the postpartum period, but they are there mainly for labor support. Postpartum, which is only in the postpartum period. They come by the house and can cook, clean, watch other children, do laundry, help with breastfeeding, and any other help you may need in the postpartum period.

Depending on which you want to be, you can sign up for a conference with any of the doula programs available. DONA is the biggest one, but I love CAPPA and Birthing From Within. There are a few others, I’m sure, but I only know those three. I am actually doing my CAPPA certification next year and then my Birthing From Withing the year after that.

The kids thing can get pretty difficult, but I have amazing friends here that are willing to watch my daughter if I have to go to a birth and my husband is at work. I’ve been pretty lucky lately and have only had to go when my husband has been home so we haven’t needed a babysitter yet.

Labor is very unpredictable, and can last days. The hardest part is finding support that is willing to help you when you have to leave right away and need someone to watch your children for a few hours. It can get pretty hectic, but so far it has been pretty easy.

Question #3:
From Valerie’s Blog: What do you know about fertility supplements? I know you know a lot about alot, so I thought I’d ask what your thoughts are on taking the herbal route opposed to common fertility treatments….

I would actually rather go the herbal route before I went to common fertility treatments. They are easier on your system and easier for your body to digest.

The ones I would use before anything else are:

-Evening Primrose Oil: This in pill form helps to lessen the PMS symptoms women normally have and also increases your amount and quality of fertile cervical mucus so that more sperm are more likely to get to the egg. It should only be taken from menstruation to ovulation, so you will need to know when you ovulate so you can stop taking it. The dosage per day is 1500 mg to 3000 mg, depending on what helps you have a better quality mucus. It can take a month or two for the signs to truly show, but a lot of women say this was a lot better than taking progesterone to help with their mucus quality.

-False Unicorn Root: This is actually taken by North American women to deter miscarriage. It has special steroid herbs that help normalize the luteal phase, which also helps woman to ovulate and not have anovulatory cycles. Depending on which type you get it will tell you have to take it to best help your cycle. Since a lot of infertility has to do with the luteal phase and/or ovulation, this does help both of those.

-Chaste Berry (vitex): This one is great because it was used by the Greeks as an aphrodisiac, but it also increases the hormones in your system making your cycles more regular and also more balanced. It can be taken by itself, but most take it in addition to Evening Primrose Oil so that their cycle is more balanced and they also produce better cervical mucus so they have the best chance of conception. This is actually the first thing people recommend to someone that is unable to get pregnant or has been trying for a long time and can’t keep a pregnancy.

-Baby Aspirin: This actually has been known to increase the lining of your uterus to a healthier tone, and also thins your blood to prevent miscarriage from blood clots forming in the placenta or in the lining where the baby has implanted. The only problem is that it is only able to be used for a short time (6 mos I think) and then it actually hurts your fertility more. But, people have said that they felt better and more energized just from taking a baby aspirin a day. And since it helps with miscarriage, it is one of the greatest things you can take if you have a history of miscarriage.

-Red Raspberry Leaf: This helps increase progesterone amounts in your body so that it helps prevent miscarriage. It is also used in pregnancy to help relax the uterus for an easier labor, though this one is not proven. It helps by aiding the fertilized egg attaching to the uterus and staying attached.

There are tons more, but I think these are the best ones to try before going to the fertility medications. They naturally help your body create the hormones you need, and aren’t hard on your body at all.

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5 Responses

  1. Great answers:)I just wanted to second your advice about herbal supplements. I just started taking EPO,Vitex,RRL, and B6, as well as using natural progesterone cream to increase my fertility. This regimen has already added two days to my luteal phase which is normally on the shorter side, and my temps are looking much better. I'm not a fan of drugs or pills overall, but I am sold on these as they seem to work really well:)

  2. We've been tweeting for some time but I am finally here! I love Q&A and your answers are so great and detailed. Good luck on your journey! I am now following your blog!

  3. Hi Kayce! ("sputniksweehrt" from Twitter) I was just reading this and it sounds so much like my path. I went to college, but nothing really made me all that excited – then I got pregnant and started learning about natural birth, etc… the experience was so powerful for me I just turned into a "birth geek" (I'm stealing that term! ;)) and this is the one thing I love learning about more than anything else. This is great info, too, about how to become a midwife & the different types of Doulas… thanks!!!! 🙂

  4. Hi Kayce! ("sputniksweehrt" from Twitter) I was just reading this and it sounds so much like my path. I went to college, but nothing really made me all that excited – then I got pregnant and started learning about natural birth, etc… the experience was so powerful for me I just turned into a "birth geek" (I'm stealing that term! ;)) and this is the one thing I love learning about more than anything else. This is great info, too, about how to become a midwife & the different types of Doulas… thanks!!!! 🙂

  5. I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.Lucyhttp://maternitymotherhood.net

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